Fr Angelo Confalonieri Father Angelo Confalonieri is a name that is not at all familiar to most Australians, and quite understandably so. He was born in 1813 at Riva in north eastern Italy, near the famous city of Trent, the city where the council of the Counter Reformation was held. Angelo’s early education was completed in his home town of Riva del Garda, but in later years he moved to the city of Trent (Italy) for secondary classes. It was in these years that he felt the inclination to become a priest, particularly a missionary priest. At first the Capuchin vocation appealed to him, particularly the missionary apostolate which is part of their work. He did not follow this way, but entered the Diocesan Seminary of Trent instead.
Sunday, 04 January 2015 00:00

The Solomon Island revisited

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I visited the Solomon Islands in August and September 2014, eager to see some of the relief projects undertaken by the Salesians and the Salesian Sisters in the aftermath of the cyclone in early 2014. As well I wished to visit Don Bosco Technical School at Henderson, the Agricultural Training centre at Tetere and the Sisters’ Hostel at Henderson. Finally the visit afforded me the opportunity to participate in the 10th anniversary celebrations of Don Bosco Rural Training Centre, Tetere.
On a sunny spring day in Adelaide, there was a celebration of the sixty years of St.John Bosco School, Brooklyn Park, South Australia, on 21 September. The school was founded by the Salesian Sisters as their first work in Australia, and staff by the sisters for most of its life. The current leadership team consists of the principal is Mr Paul Murphy, deputy principal Mrs Mia Harms, and R.E. Coordinator Mrs Catherine Birchmore.
Saturday, 03 January 2015 00:00

Kingdom of Wonder

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Upon completion of seven wonderful months at Don Bosco Technical School (DBTS) Phnom Penh, it seems timely to reflect on the journey so far and share some of our experiences with the Salesian community back home in Australia. Perhaps I should start by mentioning that they sure don’t call Cambodia the ‘Kingdom of Wonder’ for nothing. Khmer culture and tradition is as bright and rich as any other – we have fallen in love with many Cambodian rituals; namely the various dancing related traditions.
Saturday, 03 January 2015 00:00

Blessing of Savio wing

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On Monday 25 August 2014, whilst on Provincial Visitation, I was privileged to open and bless the refurbished Savio Wing at Dominic College, Glenorchy, during a joyful afternoon ceremony bathed in beautiful Tasmanian sunshine.
Saturday, 03 January 2015 00:00

Dedication of Xavier College’s New Chapel

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The new chapel with its magnificent lead-light window that forms the entire backdrop to the sanctuary. It depicts the gathering of community around Jesus. The new Xavier College chapel was dedicated by Archbishop Philip Wilson on Tuesday, 16 September. The chapel takes pride of place in the centre of the College overlooking the central Bosco lawns. The chapel has the capacity to seat 80 to 100 and key features include the magnificent lead-light window that forms the entire backdrop to the sanctuary. It depicts the gathering of community around Jesus.
Saturday, 03 January 2015 00:00

Can we still be good?

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Parents and grandparents used often tell children to “be good!” While it’s out of fashion today, what do you need to be “good”? An old American Indian story tells how, during a year of great famine and difficulty for the tribe, a grandmother and her grandson were sitting one day chatting. The grandmother says thoughtfully: “I feel there are two wolves fighting in my heart: one is anger, hatred and violence; the other is love, compassion and forgiveness.”
Saturday, 03 January 2015 00:00

Don Bosco’s grand plan for holiness

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Part 4: Cheerfulness, Duties, Piety The forth and final in a series of articles written by Fr Chris Ford SDB on Don Bosco’s plan for holiness. Don Bosco promoted his grand programme of holiness, “cheerfulness, duties and piety”, amongst his boys at the Oratory of St Francis de Sales. He provided them with a way of holiness that was easy, suited to their age and circumstances and led to a happy life. However, he would never allow the quest for holiness to lead his boys becoming self-absorbed.
Saturday, 03 January 2015 00:00

Church without frontiers, Mother to all

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Message of Pope Francis for the World Day of Refugees, 2015 Dear Brothers and Sisters, Jesus is “the evangelizer par excellence and the Gospel in person”. His solicitude, particularly for the most vulnerable and marginalized, invites all of us to care for the frailest and to recognize his suffering countenance, especially in the victims of new forms of poverty and slavery. The mission of the Church, herself a pilgrim in the world and the Mother of all, is thus to love Jesus Christ, to adore and love him, particularly in the poorest and most abandoned; among these are certainly migrants and refugees, who are trying to escape difficult living conditions and dangers of every kind. For this reason, the theme for this year’s World Day of Migrants and Refugees is: Church without frontiers, Mother to all.
There is a great deal to suggest that the world is becoming more violent. Statistics of crimes of violence are soaring. Terrorism has become an everyday instrument of political action. Nightly our mass media carry reports of atrocities in the Middle East, the summary executions of captured soldiers, the heartless bombing of hospitals, schools and family homes and the recent shooting down of a commercial airliner with great loss of life. Prominent among the victims are, of course, children and the defenceless. “Homo homini lupus, Man is a wolf to man” was a popular Roman proverb attributed to Plautus. Yet still so many talk of peace and I often wonder what  it is that they mean by the word ‘peace’. Like other often-used words, such as ‘truth’, ‘justice’ or ‘love’, peace is a word which has many and varied meanings according to personal experiences.